Submission Guidelines

 

INPAGE MENU

Abridged structure
  • Editorials
  • Original Research Article
  • Review Article
  • Case Report
  • Cover Letter
Full structure
  • Original Research Article
  • Review Article
  • Case Report

Overview

The author guidelines include information about the types of articles received for publication and preparing a manuscript for submission. Other relevant information about the journal's policies and the reviewing process can be found under the about section. The compulsory cover letter forms part of a submission and must be submitted together with all the required forms. All forms need to be completed in English.

 

 

Editorials


Editorials are by invitation only and are intended to provide expert comment on relevant topics within the focus and scope of the journal.

 

Word limit

1000 words

References

10 or less

 

Original Research Article


An original article provides an overview of innovative research in a particular field within or related to the focus and scope of the journal, presented according to a clear and well-structured format.

 

Word limit

3500-5000 words (excluding the structured abstract and references)

Unstructured abstract

250 words

References

60 or less

Tables/Figures

no more than 7 Tables/Figures

Ethical statement

should be included in the manuscript

Compulsory supplementary file

ethical clearance letter/certificate

 

Review Article


Review articles provide a comprehensive summary of research on a certain topic, and a perspective on the state of the field and where it is heading. These articles are often meta-analyses comparing and combining findings of previously published studies. Systematic reviews should follow the same basic structure as other original research articles. The aim and objectives should focus on a clinical question that will be addressed in the review. The methods section should describe in detail the search strategy, criteria used to select or reject articles, attempts made to obtain all important and relevant studies and deal with publication bias (including grey and unpublished literature), how the quality of included studies was appraised, the methodology used to extract and/or analyse data. Results should describe the homogeneity of the different findings, clearly present the overall results and any meta-analysis.See full structure of review articles below.

 

Word limit

3500-5000 words (excluding the abstract and references)

Abstract

250 words

References

60 or less

Tables/Figures

Data in the text should not be repeated extensively in tables or figures.

 

Case Report


The case report should highlight a critical issue that is relevant to the areas of psychometrics and psychological assessment.

 

Word limit

1500 words (excluding the unstructured abstract and references)

Abstract

250 wwords

References

15 or less

Tables/Figures

no more than 6 Tables/Figures

Ethical statement

should be included in the manuscript

Compulsory supplementary file

ethical clearance letter/certificate

 

Cover Letter


The format of the compulsory cover letter forms part of your submission. Kindly download and complete, in English, the provided cover letter.

 

Anyone that has made a significant contribution to the research and the paper must be listed as an author in your cover letter. Contributions that fall short of meeting the criteria as stipulated in our policy should rather be mentioned in the ‘Acknowledgements’ section of the manuscript. Read our authorship guidelines and author contribution statement policies.

 

 

Original Research Article full structure


The manuscript should begin with the title, followed by the abstract, up to 6 keywords (in alphabetical order) followed by an introduction or a literature review section. Thereafter, the following headings and subheadings should be used as applicable: Methods (Participants, Design, Data collection methods/Instruments, Procedure and Data Analysis - which includes information on the statistical and qualitative data analytic techniques or computerised analytic programmes, if applicable); Results; Discussion; Conclusion; and References. These headings are described below.

 

Full title: Specific, descriptive, concise, and comprehensible to readers outside the field. Maximum of 95 characters (including spaces).

 

Abstract: The Abstract should provide the context or background for the study and should state the study's purpose, methods used (sample, setting, data collection tools and procedures, analytical methods), main findings, and principal conclusions. The Abstract should not exceed 250 words. Please minimise the use of abbreviations and do not cite references in the abstract.

 

Introduction: The Introduction should put the focus of the manuscript into a broader context and explain its social and scientific value. The contribution to knowledge should be clarified. The introduction should include a brief review of the key literature. If there are relevant controversies or disagreements in the field, they should be presented and critically examined. Conclude with a brief statement of the overall aim or aims of the study and the research questions/hypotheses being addressed. Cite only directly pertinent references, and do not include data from work being reported.

 

Methods: The Methods section should provide clarity about how and why a study was done in a particular way. It should present enough detail for the reproduction of the findings. Protocols for new methods should be included, but well-established methodological procedures may simply be referenced. A full description of the methods should be included in the manuscript itself rather than in a supplemental file. Hence the methods should comprise headings for Participants, Design, Data collection methods/Instruments, Procedure and Data Analysis. Information on the ethics clearance from the relevant review committee (institutional or national) and ethical considerations must be included in the Procedures section. If an organisation was paid or otherwise contracted to help conduct the research (examples include data collection and management), then this should be detailed in the procedures as well.

 

Results: Present your results in logical sequence in the text, tables, and figures, giving the main or most important findings first. Do not repeat all the data in the tables or figures in the text; emphasise or summarise only the most important observations. Provide data on all the questions and aims of the study. For quantitative studies, give numeric results not only as derivatives (for example, percentages) but also as the absolute numbers from which the derivatives were calculated, and specify the statistical significance attached to them if any. For all significant results, report the appropriate effect sizes. Restrict tables and figures to those needed to explain the argument of the paper and to assess supporting data. For qualitative data, be sure to include pertinent quotes, text or other supporting evidence.

 

Discussion: It is useful to begin the discussion by briefly summarising the main findings, and explore possible mechanisms or explanations for these findings. Emphasise the new and important aspects of your study and put your findings in the context of the totality of the relevant evidence. State the limitations of your study, and explore the implications of your findings for future research, policy, practice and theory. Do not repeat in detail data or other information given in other parts of the manuscript, such as in the Introduction or the Results section. Link the conclusions with the goals of the study but avoid unqualified statements and conclusions not adequately supported by the data. In particular, distinguish between clinical and statistical significance where appropriate, and avoid making statements on economic benefits and costs unless the manuscript includes the relevant economic data and analyses. Avoid claiming priority or alluding to work that has not been completed.

 

Acknowledgements: Those who contributed to the work but do not meet our authorship criteria should be listed in the Acknowledgements with a description of the contribution. Authors are responsible for ensuring that anyone named in the Acknowledgements agrees to be named. Also provide the following, each under their own heading:

 

  • Competing interests: This section should list specific competing interests associated with any of the authors. If authors declare that no competing interests exist, the article will include a statement to this effect: ‘The authors declare that they have no financial or personal relationship(s) that may have inappropriately influenced them in writing this article’.Read our policy on competing interests.
  • Author contributions: All authors must meet the criteria for authorship as outlined in the authorship policy and author contribution statement policies.
  • Funding: Provide information on funding if relevant.
  • Disclaimer: A statement that the views expressed in the submitted article are the author’s own and are not the official position of the institution or funder.

 

References: The journal requires referencing that follows the American Psychological Association (APA) referencing guidelines. Authors should provide direct references to original research sources whenever possible. Authors, editors or peer reviewers should not use references to promote self-interests. Refer to the journal referencing style downloadable on our Formatting Requirements page.

 

The above manuscript section guidelines are adapted from the recommendations from the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors: preparing for submission, available from http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/manuscript-preparation/preparing-for-submission.html on 24 April 2017.

 

 

Review Article full structure


Title: The article’s full title should contain a maximum of 95 characters (including spaces).

 

Abstract: The abstract should be no longer than 250 words and must be written in the past tense. The abstract should give a concise account of the objectives, methods, results and significance of the matter. The abstract should address the following:

  • Why is the topic important to the field? State the context of the review
  • What is the purpose of your review? Describe the aim or purpose of your review.
  • How did you go about performing the review? Describe the methods used for searching, selecting and appraising your evidence.
  • What are the findings? What are the main findings of your literature review.
  • What are the implications of your answer? Briefly summarise any potential implications.

Introduction: Present an argument for the social and scientific value of your review that is itself supported by the literature. Present the aim and objectives of your literature review.

 

Methods: Outline how you searched for, selected and appraised the literature that you used. Discuss any methodological limitations.

 

Review findings: Present your review of the literature and make use of appropriate sub-headings. Your review should be a critical synthesis of the literature.

 

Implications and recommendations: Discuss the findings of your review in terms of the implications for policy makers and clinicians or recommendations for future research.

 

Conclusion: This should clearly state the main conclusions of the review in terms of addressing the original aim and objectives.

 

Acknowledgements: Those who contributed to the work but do not meet our authorship criteria should be listed in the Acknowledgments with a description of the contribution. Authors are responsible for ensuring that anyone named in the Acknowledgments agrees to be named.

Also provide the following, each under their own heading:

  • Competing interests: This section should list specific competing interests associated with any of the authors. If authors declare that no competing interests exist, the article will include a statement to this effect: The authors declare that they have no financial or personal relationship(s) that may have inappropriately influenced them in writing this article. Read our policy on competing interests.
  • Author contributions:  All authors must meet the criteria for authorship as outlined in the authorship policy and author contribution statement policies.
  • Funding: Provide information on funding if relevant
  • Disclaimer: a statement that the views expressed in the submitted article are his or her own and not an official position of the institution or funder.

 

References: Authors should provide direct references to original research sources whenever possible. References should not be used by authors, editors, or peer reviewers to promote self-interests. Refer to the journal referencing style downloadable on our Formatting Requirements page.

 

 

Case Report full structure


Title: The article’s full title should contain a maximum of 95 characters (including spaces).

 

Abstract: The abstract should be no longer than 250 words and must be written in the past tense. The abstract should give a concise account of the Introduction, Patient/Client presentation, Management and outcome and significance of the matter. The abstract should consist of:

  • Introduction: Describe the context and the reason for publishing this patient/client study.
  • Patient/Client presentation: Describe your 3-stage assessment of the patient/client.
  • Management and outcome: Describe the management plan, progress and final outcome.
  • Conclusion: Summarise the lessons learnt and key implications or recommendations.

Introduction: Convey clearly what is particularly interesting about the patient/client that you want to describe to the reader. It is useful to begin by placing the study in a historical or social context. If similar cases have been reported previously, please describe them briefly. Clarify your aim or objectives in publishing this patient/client study.

 

Ethical considerations: Papers based on a case study that involves the treatment of humans must adhere to the Declaration of Helsinki on Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects. Specify the recognised ethics committee from which approval for the case study was obtained; also state the serial number of the ethical clearance. Case studies must have the consent of the patient/client or waiver of consent approved by an ethics committee.

 

Patient/Client presentation: Describe your patient/client in detail with consideration of the following aspects:

  • Describe the information that was gathered on the patient’s/client’s medical problem(s) from the consultation, physical examination and results of any investigations.
  • Describe the information that was gathered on the patient’s/client’s perspective of their illness (loss of function, ideas, beliefs, concerns, expectations, or feelings)
  • Describe the information that was gathered on the patient’s/client’s context (family structure and function, occupational issues, environment)
  • Provide a 3-stage assessment of the patient’s/client’s clinical, individual and contextual issues.

 

Management and outcome: In this section, you should clearly describe the plan for care, as well as the care that was actually provided, how the patient’s/client’s condition progressed over time and the final outcome.

 

Discussion: Summarise the key points, lessons learnt and discuss these in relation to the literature. Clarify the implications or recommendations that arise from this patient/client study.

 

Acknowledgements: Those who contributed to the work but do not meet our authorship criteria should be listed in the Acknowledgments with a description of the contribution. Authors are responsible for ensuring that anyone named in the Acknowledgments agrees to be named. Also provide the following, each under their own heading:

  • Competing interests: This section should list specific competing interests associated with any of the authors. If authors declare that no competing interests exist, the article will include a statement to this effect: The authors declare that they have no financial or personal relationship(s) that may have inappropriately influenced them in writing this article. Read our policy on competing interests.
  • Author contributions:  All authors must meet the criteria for authorship as outlined in the authorship policy and author contribution statement policies.
  • Funding: Provide information on funding if relevant
  • Disclaimer: a statement that the views expressed in the submitted article are his or her own and not an official position of the institution or funder.

 

References: Authors should provide direct references to original research sources whenever possible. References should not be used by authors, editors, or peer reviewers to promote self-interests. Refer to the journal referencing style downloadable on our Formatting Requirements page.

 

 

Formatting requirements

Checklist

Please review the checklist below to prepare your manuscript. This will help to make sure your submission is complete and gets handled as quickly as possible.

  • CHECK 1: Make sure your manuscript is the right fit for the journal by reviewing the journal information.
  • CHECK 2: Read the publication fees.
  • CHECK 3: Review if the journal publishes the type of article that you wish to submit. Read the types of articles published.
  • CHECK 4: You must be comfortable with publishing in an open access journal. Read our copyrights and licensing policy.
  • CHECK 5: The entire manuscript must be neatly prepared, spell-checked, and adhere to the formatting requirements stipulated in our submission guidelines.
  • CHECK 6: Prepare the cover letter and licensing forms as required on the submissions guidelines.
  • CHECK 7: Read our publication policies, privacy policy and terms of use.
  • CHECK 8: We recommend authors to have ORCID IDs, which can only be assigned by the ORCID Registry. ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is a nonproprietary alphanumeric code to uniquely identify scientific and other academic authors and contributors. You must conform to their standards for expressing ORCID iDs, and will have the opportunity to include the full URL (e.g. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1825-0097) during the submission process, that will link to your name when the manuscript is published.

Forms